Increased Precautions We're Taking in Response to the Coronavirus
As updates on the impact of the coronavirus continue to be released, we want to take a moment to inform you of the heightened preventative measures we have put in place at Little Creek Behavioral Health to keep our patients, their families, and our employees safe. All efforts are guided by and in adherence to the recommendations distributed by the CDC.

Please note that for the safety of our patients, their families, and our staff, on-site visitation is no longer allowed at Little Creek Behavioral Health.

  • This restriction has been implemented in compliance with updated corporate and state regulations to further reduce the risks associated with COVID-19.
  • We are offering visitation through telehealth services so that our patients can remain connected to their loved ones.
  • Alternate methods of communication for other services are being vetted and may be offered when deemed clinically appropriate.

For specific information regarding these changes and limitations, please contact us directly.

CDC updates are consistently monitored to ensure that all guidance followed is based on the latest information released.

  • All staff has received infection prevention and control training.
  • Thorough disinfection and hygiene guidance has been provided.
  • Patient care supplies such as masks and hand sanitizer are being monitored and utilized.
  • Temperature and symptom screening protocols are in place for all patients and staff.
  • Social distancing strategies have been implemented to ensure that patients and staff maintain proper distance from one another at all times.
  • Cleaning service contracts have been reviewed for additional support.
  • Personal protective equipment items are routinely checked to ensure proper and secure storage.
  • CDC informational posters are on display to provide important reminders on proper infection prevention procedures.
  • We are in communication with our local health department to receive important community-specific updates.

The safety of our patients, their families, and our employees is our top priority, and we will remain steadfast in our efforts to reduce any risk associated with COVID-19.

The CDC has provided a list of easy tips that can help prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue and then immediately dispose of the tissue.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that are frequently touched.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.

For detailed information on COVID-19, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

Preferred Adolescent Co-Occurring Substance Abuse Treatment Center

Little Creek Behavioral Health offers comprehensive co-occurring substance abuse treatment for children and adolescents ages 12-18. Features of care at our co-occurring substance abuse treatment center in Conway, Arkansas, include personalized residential programming and specialized services for young people who are deaf or hard of hearing.  

Understanding Co-Occurring Addiction

Learn about mental health concerns and co-occurring addiction among children and adolescents

Many young people who are experiencing a mental health concern also struggle with addiction. In clinical terms, this additional substance use disorder is known as a co-occurring disorder.   

The following are common co-occurring addictions that we treat among children and adolescents who have a primary diagnosis of a mental or behavioral health disorder: 

  • Alcohol use disorder 
  • Cannabis use disorder 
  • Cocaine use disorder 
  • Methamphetamine use disorder 
  • Heroin use disorder 
  • Opioid use disorder 
  • Stimulant use disorder 
  • Tobacco use disorder 

In certain cases, the anguish of a mental health challenge may push a young person into substance use, while in others, the pain of addiction can spur the onset of a mental health concern. At Little Creek Behavioral Health, we treat children and adolescents who have a primary diagnosis of a mental health challenge who may also be suffering from co-occurring addiction. The following are among the more common mental health disorders that we treat at our facility in Conway, Arkansas: 

  • Depressive disorders 
  • Anxiety disorders 
  • Bipolar disorder 
  • Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) 
  • Conduct disorder 
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) 

It’s important to note that this is not an exhaustive list of the conditions we treat as a primary diagnosis. All admissions decisions at Little Creek Behavioral Health are made on a case-by-case basis based on what’s in the best interest of each child or adolescent after a thorough examination of their background, needs, and goals. 

Statistics

Statistics about mental health concerns and co-occurring addiction among children and adolescents 

The following statistics about addiction among children and adolescents come from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA): 

Causes & Risk Factors

Possible causes of co-occurring addiction among children and adolescents

A child’s or adolescent’s risk for developing co-occurring addiction can be influenced by several genetic and environmental factors. The following are among the more common:

  • Early aggressive behavior
  • Abuse and neglect as a child
  • Family history of substance use
  • Lack of parental supervision
  • Drug availability among peers
  • Poverty

Signs & Symptoms

Symptoms of co-occurring addiction among children and adolescents

The signs and symptoms of a young person who has a co-occurring addiction may vary, but, generally speaking, they may display the following:

Behavioral symptoms:

  • Loss of interest in activities once considered important
  • Academic struggles
  • Stealing or selling belongings
  • Shifts in peer groups
  • Withdrawal from family and friends

Physical symptoms:

  • Changes in sleeping habits
  • Shakiness or generally seeming unsteady
  • Significant weight loss or weight gain

Mental symptoms: 

  • Agitation
  • Anxiety or depression
  • Mood swings
  • Impaired judgment

Effects

Potential effects of co-occurring addiction among children and adolescents

No matter how minor a co-occurring addiction may seem, if left untreated, it has the potential to have seriously negative ramifications for a child or adolescent who is already struggling with a mental health concern. Impaired mental processes, physical symptoms, and behavioral changes resulting from addiction can lead to catastrophic effects, such as:

  • Academic struggles or risk of dropout/expulsion
  • Damaged relationships with friends and family
  • Increased risk of physical violence
  • Unplanned pregnancies
  • Sexually transmitted diseases
  • Trouble with law enforcement that leads to incarceration

Co-Occurring Disorders

Mental health concerns among children and adolescents that are often accompanied by co-occurring addiction

Many children and adolescents who develop mental health concerns also struggle with addiction. The following are among the many mental health disorders that can increase a young person’s risk for co-occurring addiction:

  • Anxiety
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Depression
  • PTSD
  • ADHD

These are just some examples of behavioral health concerns that can co-occur in young people who are battling addiction. At Little Creek Behavioral Health, we treat these mental health disorders and others as a primary diagnosis along with co-occurring addiction.

Why Seek Treatment

How Little Creek Behavioral Health in Conway, AR, can help children and adolescents who are struggling with mental health concerns and co-occurring addiction

At Little Creek Behavioral Health, we understand how challenging it can be to choose care for a child or adolescent who is struggling with a mental health concern and co-occurring addiction. That’s why we take into account each young person’s unique needs, recovery goals, and medical history to formulate a treatment plan that sets them up for the best outcomes and a more successful future. 

With educational services to keep children and adolescents up to speed academically, extended length-of-stay options, and a specialty track designed for young patients who are hard of hearing, our facility offers evidence-based practices to help any child experience continued success long after their time with us is over.